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Barbara Kingsolver

Biography

Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver is the author of nine bestselling works of fiction, including the novels FLIGHT BEHAVIOR, THE LACUNA, THE POISONWOOD BIBLE, ANIMAL DREAMS and THE BEAN TREES, as well as books of poetry, essays and creative nonfiction. Her work of narrative nonfiction is the enormously influential bestseller ANIMAL, VEGETABLE, MIRACLE: A Year of Food Life. Kingsolver’s work has been translated into more than 20 languages and has earned literary awards and a devoted readership at home and abroad. She was awarded the National Humanities Medal, our country’s highest honor for service through the arts, as well as the prestigious Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her body of work. She lives with her family on a farm in southern Appalachia.

Barbara Kingsolver

Books by Barbara Kingsolver

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

The New York Times bestselling author of FLIGHT BEHAVIOR, THE LACUNA and THE POISONWOOD BIBLE returns with a timely novel that interweaves past and present to explore the human capacity for resiliency and compassion in times of great upheaval.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

Dellarobia Turnbow is a 29-year old who nurtured ambitions before becoming pregnant and marrying at seventeen. Now, after more than a decade of tending small children, she has initiated a self-destructive affair. The tryst never happens. Instead she walks into something she cannot explain or understand.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

Born in the United States, Harrison Shepher is reared in a series of provisional households in Mexico. One fateful day, he finds himself mixing plaster for famed Mexican muralist Diego Rivera. He discovers a passion for Aztec history and meets the exotic, imperious artist Frida Kahlo. When he goes to work for Lev Trotsky, Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Nonfiction

Bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver returns with her first nonfiction narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

In 1959, Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist, takes his four young daughters, his wife, and his mission to the Belgian Congo --- a place, he is sure, where he can save needy souls. But the seeds they plant bloom in tragic ways within this complex culture.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

Alice Greer, her daughter Taylor, and Taylor's informally adopted daughter, Turtle, all seem fated to lives uncomplicated by relationships with men. But simplicity is gone forever when Taylor and Turtle (who is Cherokee) appear on TV by a coincidence of fate, and come to the attention of Annawake Fourkiller, a lawyer for the Cherokee nation.

by Barbara Kingsolver

Cynical and self-absorbed, Codi Noline has been drifting in an aimless relationship and through a series of jobs when she packs up and returns home to the town of Grace, Arizona to care for her physician father, who has Alzheimers, and to teach high school science. Emotionally distant from her childhood and father, feeling herself to be an outsider and a failure, Codi sees nothing but differences between herself and her younger sister, Hallie, a political activist, and now, a volunteer worker in Nicaragua. Through her involvements with Loyd Peregrina (a handsome trainman of Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache descent), the local matriarchs of the "Stitch and Bitch Club," and her students, and through reading Hallie's letters from Nicaragua, Codi gradually lets go of her defensive isolation. Slowly, she recovers her connection to a sense of self and a community that has always been there, but she had forgotten. When her hometown is threatened with environmental catastrophe, she finds herself, like Hallie, taking responsibility for changing the world around her.

by Barbara Kingsolver - Fiction

Looking to escape an oppressive upbringing in rural Kentucky, Marietta Greer heads west in a beat-up Volkswagen. By the time her car breaks down in Tucson, she has with her a stunned, silent three-year-old Cherokee girl who was, literally, dropped into her arms one night and who Marietta names Turtle. Here in Tucson, among a group of fellow travelers, Marietta and Turtle create new lives and redefine the meanings of home and family.